Canadian Friends of Burma, CFOB
Burma Issues
Campaigns
Canadian Policy
Corporate Complicity
Drugs
News
Local Groups
Resources and Links
Contact Us

History Of Burma

The British also further divided the numerous ethnic minorities by favouring some groups, such as the Karen, for positions in the military and in local rural administrations. During the 1920s, the first protests by Burma intelligentsia and Buddhist Monks were launched against British rule. By 1935, the Students Union at Rangoon University was at teh forefront of what would evolve into an active and powerful movement for national independence. A young law student Aung San (above), executive-committee member and magazine editor for the Students Union, emerged as the potential new leader of the national movement. In the years that followed, he successfully organized a series of student strikes at the university, gaining the support of the nation. To demonstrate his conviction that Burma was rightfully Burmese and not British, he and his closest associates defiantly called themselves thakins, or” masters “, which was a title previously used only for addressing the British.

 

 

 

 Return to Home Page


Canadian Friends of Burma, 145 Spruce St. Suite 206, Ottawa, ON K1R 6P1
tel#: (613) 237-8056, fax#: (613) 563-0017, email: cfob@cfob.org